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tbayz1
07-24-2007, 10:44 PM
After much questioning about a Dallas franchise in the PBL, a market that was announced with Conneticut in the early days of the PBL is finally here:

http://www.oursportscentral.com/services/releases/?id=3513081


Although there is no team name, no website, and we pretty much dont know anything about the team YET, this is what you call an owner! A very impressive career!

The Magician
07-24-2007, 11:29 PM
... a Dallas franchise in the PBL ... is finally here:

http://www.oursportscentral.com/services/releases/?id=3513081


Instant Credibility!

bdaly
07-25-2007, 09:10 AM
His business background is impressive, so they should be a solid addition. Adding teams in large markets with an NBA team remains challenging though. But if anyone can do it, it's someone with his sports marketing background. I've been told to expect an early August announcement in NYC that'll solidify the PBL's plans for 2008. I'm looking forward to it.

Minor League Man
07-25-2007, 10:14 AM
Good find for the PBL! Owner sure seems good enough. (Notice while the ABA has all their sideshow owners like a three-ring circus, the PBL shoves that aside and just wants to play basketball, so they choose guys focused on the game).

That said, look for the team to try for Reunion Arena (he's got deep enough pockets)

tbayz1
07-25-2007, 10:41 AM
IMO not only with his deep pockets, he has the right mind, and obviously is at the top of his game in the marketing world, the guy prolly has alot of connections too!


Im still skeptical about the league, but this is a sign to a great step foward, lets hope we see more owners like this

SignGuyDino
07-25-2007, 02:31 PM
OK, stupid question time: Does this mean NIKE will be a major sponsor?

tbayz1
07-25-2007, 04:00 PM
hmmm Nike as a sponsor....

I could see that

bomp
07-26-2007, 04:49 PM
I've been told to expect an early August announcement in NYC that'll solidify the PBL's plans for 2008. I'm looking forward to it.

I thought they were starting in 2007 though.

I hope this isn't a case of 'Those can't do, teach'. ;)

Minor League Man
07-26-2007, 05:02 PM
I thought they were starting in 2007 though.

I hope this isn't a case of 'Those can't do, teach'. ;)
They're starting play in January 2008...

tbayz1
07-26-2007, 05:11 PM
and correct me if im wrong, but doesnt the PBL plan to play a few exihibition games in December leading up to the start of the season in Jan

Ken, Steelheads fan
07-26-2007, 05:30 PM
I thought they were starting in 2007 though.

I hope this isn't a case of 'Those can't do, teach'. ;)

I believe the season starts as late as January, thus a 2008 start.

Dallas has the Mavericks, so a minor league hoops franchise there spells F-O-R-G-I-D-D-A-B-O-U-T-I-T. The fans weren't interested in the NBADL Fort Worth team, so now they're going to embrace a PBL team in Dallas?!? I think not. The organizers of the PBL have made one miscalculation after another (beginning with ever allowing themselves to be associated with the ABA). The only sense I can make out of this announcement is that the owner is auditioning for a future D-league franchise...and that in itself doesn't make much sense. He could skip the middle man and just save his money for a chance at the NBADL.

The Premier league at the moment seems to be the IBL...and that's not saying much. :roll:

bdaly
07-26-2007, 07:48 PM
First, yes, their plan is to play some international exhibitions in December, and the season will kick off in January.

As for the league, we'll have to wait for the press conference event to learn more. I don't think any of us can really make any solid conclusions at this point. There are some good signs, but I'll need to see the final map of teams, the travel structure, and attendance expectations before I can say much. And, they're wisely keeping things close to the vest until everything is set; I'm sure that's the point of the NYC event next month.

It's nice to see the team got a Dallas News article yesterday though, albeit a modest one. Finally, Patton serves on the PBL board. So the hypothesis mentioned here seems unlikely. His expertise makes him a great addition to the league. Whether he'll make it work in a tough market like Dallas remains to be seen. But, if anyone can, it's probably someone with his solid marketing background (don't worry, teaching isn't his primary gig).

Ken, Steelheads fan
07-27-2007, 01:42 AM
As for the league, we'll have to wait for the press conference event to learn more. I don't think any of us can really make any solid conclusions at this point...

There's plenty of information out there to reach a definitive conclusion...well, at least for me. Placing a minor league hoops franchise in Dallas and intending to play at the height of the NBA season is simply icing on the cake.

Instant Credibility!

Yeah, nothing says instant credibility like no prior minor league experience. Also, nothing says instant credibility (concerning another PBL team) like sending-out a bogus press release:
http://www.oursportscentral.com/services/releases/?id=3411953

...the Ripknees cruised to a 128-86 victory over the Gary (Ind) Giants on Thursday evening at the Gangelhoff Center. The Giants had just moved to Gary from Twin Cities.

Huh?!? Gary Giants?!? The funny thing is that the Gary Steelheads are giving (gave?) the PBL a look.

bectond
07-27-2007, 10:05 AM
The Premier league at the moment seems to be the IBL

Did the NBA go out of business while I was sleeping?

The IBL is nothing more the an ABA spin-off, just like the PBL. The CBA is still the best league by far and it is not even close. A January start date will prevent the league from signing the top players. Thus, I don't see any chance of this league being Premier from a talent perspective.

Ken, Steelheads fan
07-27-2007, 10:49 AM
Did the NBA go out of business while I was sleeping?

The IBL is nothing more the an ABA spin-off, just like the PBL. The CBA is still the best league by far and it is not even close. A January start date will prevent the league from signing the top players. Thus, I don't see any chance of this league being Premier from a talent perspective.

Doh! I meant minor leagues.

Yeah, that's another thing I don't like about the PBL (among numerous other things). Season starts too late to attract the fall talent and the season starts too early to capitalize on the talent available in the spring. Season starts too late to attract the best arena dates and the season starts too early to take advantage of open spring dates.

I would agree that the CBA is the best (minor) league if the CBA wasn't such a franchise killer. Too darned expensive for what it has to offer, or not offer (no NBA call-ups...Jamario Moon was signed from the USBL). I didn't think much of the IBL either, but it's looking pretty sweet now when compared to alternative leagues (especially in the Great Lakes region).

bectond
07-27-2007, 11:23 AM
I would agree that the CBA is the best (minor) league if the CBA wasn't such a franchise killer. Too darned expensive for what it has to offer, or not offer (no NBA call-ups...Jamario Moon was signed from the USBL).

The D-League schedule came out a couple days ago, did you notice that the clubs only play a home & away vs. non-divisional teams. That is what the CBA needs to do, play more regional games. For instance, Butte should play Great Falls 12 times per season. The CBA lost out on a lot of talent by starting up late last year, they should close the gap a little this year with the D-League due to the fact that they are starting around the same time. I also have noticed a decline in overseas signings this summer as well, so more 1st year talent will be on the open market this year.

The PBL may just sign the top ABA players after X-mas, thus using the ABA as a defacto minor league. The ABA really can't do anything to stop them from cherry picking their top players. It's just extremely hard work, determining which ABA players are the best due to the fact that they don't keep stats. If that is their plan they had better hire a damn good scouting director.

bdaly
07-27-2007, 11:36 AM
intending to play at the height of the NBA season is simply icing on the cake.
Leagues that have tried playing in other season haven't exactly caught fire at the gates. I'm among those that's very unlikely to sit inside and watch basketball in June and July. There's a reason there's lots of dates open in the spring in many arenas. Clearly, other (most) minor leagues have succeeded throughout sports when playing with the major league does. Obviously, it's a little more rare when a minor league team plays in the same city as a major league one.

Clearly, the PBL needs to prove itself. We can talk about this all day, but time will tell the story. I'd be much more comfortable talking about it with full information, but to each their own. The CBA wasn't without its own significant challenges last season, but they made it through without too much carnage. So they should be stronger for it this year with time on their side, and that should allow them to slow the financial bleeding.

bomp
07-27-2007, 12:23 PM
I still don't undersatnd why Doyle & Company aren't going to the CBA? Why start late in a new league? I think they could help build minor league ball more by joining the CBA and bringing in some larger markets. Are the fees higher in the CBA or in the PBL??

psbf
07-27-2007, 03:07 PM
was not such a franchise killer, Ken?? I think you're confusing leagues here. The ABA is the one that is losing teams. The CBA is growing stronger.

dbaproball
07-27-2007, 07:45 PM
I still don't undersatnd why Doyle & Company aren't going to the CBA? Why start late in a new league? I think they could help build minor league ball more by joining the CBA and bringing in some larger markets. Are the fees higher in the CBA or in the PBL??
I'd like to know the same. The rumor mill says some sort of discussions have happened between the two, but to what extent is yet to be publicized. My guess is both sides are somewhat skeptical of each other, and you can't blame them. Look at what has gone on in minor league ball. You have to keep your guard up in this business. The combination seems to make a lot of sense and would seem to have a real chance to change things...well funded teams in the PBL and the CBA name, not to mention the geographic synergies. Regarding PBL fees, I hear that acceptance is less about league fees and more about the owners net worth and financial statements. Budgets of CBA teams and the ABA defectors to the PBL are similar.

dbaproball
07-27-2007, 07:58 PM
Doh! I meant minor leagues.

Yeah, that's another thing I don't like about the PBL (among numerous other things). Season starts too late to attract the fall talent and the season starts too early to capitalize on the talent available in the spring. Season starts too late to attract the best arena dates and the season starts too early to take advantage of open spring dates.

I would agree that the CBA is the best (minor) league if the CBA wasn't such a franchise killer. Too darned expensive for what it has to offer, or not offer (no NBA call-ups...Jamario Moon was signed from the USBL). I didn't think much of the IBL either, but it's looking pretty sweet now when compared to alternative leagues (especially in the Great Lakes region).
IBL is a good league in the overall scheme of things that has its place at the top of the summer leagues, but it is just that...a summer league, essentially a completely different business than winter ball. So, I say it's apples and oranges. The BEST thing about the IBL and it's management is that they acknowledge the financial realities of minor league basketball in their business model. Who makes the most in minor league ball? Nobody, because nobody makes anything. Who loses the least? The IBL. It almost makes them geniuses. My personal opinion is that I'd like to see them roll over to become a winter league to see how they'd shake things up. I know that is unlikely, but we need a white knight.

The Magician
07-27-2007, 08:26 PM
Yeah, nothing says instant credibility like no prior minor league experience.

YOU have seemed a little tense with regard to some of your posts the last couple of days ...

Has Minor League Basketball become a little unnerving to you?

What I meant by INSTANT CREDIBILITY ...

was my reaction to Mr. Patton's client list.

People with names like, Williams, Jordan and Marbury don't seek out and retain services from just anyone in the business world!

dbaproball
07-27-2007, 09:22 PM
YOU have seemed a little tense with regard to some of your posts the last couple of days ...

Has Minor League Basketball become a little unnerving to you?

What I meant by INSTANT CREDIBILITY ...

was my reaction to Mr. Patton's client list.

People with names like, Williams, Jordan and Marbury don't seek out and retain services from just anyone in the business world!
Magician, i always look forward to your words of wisdom. Ken's reaction is justifiable and predictable because of what others have done to our game. Controlled (some call slow) growth, national sponsors, funded teams, and recognized names like you point out are such novel ideas in the business (unfortunately) that no wonder they cause reaction. But Ken, I will approach you head on philosophically with a few of your words and implications. "No pro minor league experience" means very little to nothing. Those who have only that have failed miserably. Sorry, it's a fact. If I were to invest in a league, I care less about that and much more about BUSINESS EXPERIENCE. That's what our game is missing. We need more Cubans. (Mark's that is, not Fidels.) Create a real business around minor league basketball, and these boards will only exist to talk about teams, players, and games.

The Magician
07-27-2007, 09:50 PM
Create a real business around minor league basketball, and these boards will only exist to talk about teams, players, and games.

Sooooooo True!

Ken, Steelheads fan
07-28-2007, 02:12 PM
YOU have seemed a little tense with regard to some of your posts the last couple of days ...

Has Minor League Basketball become a little unnerving to you?

What I meant by INSTANT CREDIBILITY ...

was my reaction to Mr. Patton's client list.

People with names like, Williams, Jordan and Marbury don't seek out and retain services from just anyone in the business world!

Tense? Okay, I'm due for a long relaxing bike ride along my favorite trail anyway. I'll have to get back to minor league experience, the PBL, the CBA, and the IBL upon my return.

The Magician
07-28-2007, 08:19 PM
Tense? Okay, I'm due for a long relaxing bike ride along my favorite trail anyway.


If I read you wrong ...

It was just that your posts seemed to have a little more "punch" than usual when talking about minor league b'ball?

Ken, Steelheads fan
07-29-2007, 02:02 PM
If I read you wrong ...

It was just that your posts seemed to have a little more "punch" than usual when talking about minor league b'ball?

No problem. A little time outdoors yielding to cars, coyotes, joggers, and rollerbladers (in that order) does wonders for me.

You probably didn't read me wrong. Any punch detected is for emphasis (that's just the ham in me). http://mud.mm-a8.yimg.com/image/4028324033 Time and time again there are announcements about new franchises with great new owners. Time and time again those franchises are failures coming out of the starting blocks. Dallas is NBA country...hmmmm, Deja Vu. Remember the ill-fated CBA Utah Eagles last season (located in the Salt Lake Valley)? Supposedly great, financially stable ownership. DOH! Ownership forgot the NBA Utah Jazz were in the same Salt Lake Valley.

bdaly,
I prefer being outdoors in the warmer months too, but it wasn't so bad going back indoors for the USBL season (although the Genesis Center kept the air off to save money). It would be even better if the (Steelheads) practice of allowing players and coaches to park directly outside the south gate was stopped immediatedly. The south seating could be removed and an indoor/outdoor beer garden could be installed. Both the video scoreboard and game can be seen from such an indoor/outdoor area. Free advice.

Minor league hoops needs to reinvent itself instead of repeating the same old mistakes.

bectond
07-30-2007, 12:15 PM
We need more Cubans. (Mark's that is, not Fidels.) Create a real business around minor league basketball, and these boards will only exist to talk about teams, players, and games.

What is the true purpose of all these Basketball Leaques anyway? Are any of these owners really concerned with making a buck or developing players that can read a defense or acquire post moves? I believe these leaques exist only to inflame the egotistical desires of their owners. Their teams provide them with a means of egoism that enhances their excessive or exaggerated sense of self-importance. If you are looking for a savior you should go find a church because you're looking up the wrong tree if you think you will find one in any of these ABA spin-off leaques.

dbaproball
07-30-2007, 07:09 PM
What is the true purpose of all these Basketball Leaques anyway? Are any of these owners really concerned with making a buck or developing players that can read a defense or acquire post moves? I believe these leaques exist only to inflame the egotistical desires of their owners. Their teams provide them with a means of egoism that enhances their excessive or exaggerated sense of self-importance. If you are looking for a savior you should go find a church because you're looking up the wrong tree if you think you will find one in any of these ABA spin-off leaques.
Bectond, I'm not sure we are really disagreeing although i'm not sure I follow all of your logic.or at least intent.

Where we agree (I think)..... Yes, anybody who starts a team or a league has an ego.....anybody who starts a business needs an ego to be successful because that means you think your hotdog stand is better than the one across the street and you'll perform that way. If these owners ultimately not concerned with making a buck, they don't need to be in the basketball or any other business...or they need a rich uncle.

Where we disagree (I think)...is seemingly in the implied conclusion that the ABA is a a better home and/or a better solution than trying to find other teams of like mind and interests wo want to make things better or at minimum can count on each other. If you have ever lost money or sponsors or credibility because 3 of your opponents didn't show up one month, you'd understand the sentiment. The bottom line is that if the league dictator's interests are not in line with the teams (eg, the ABA), the team's don't have a chance. At least I see that the spin offs are trying to give the teams a voice.

bectond
07-30-2007, 07:46 PM
Bectond, I'm not sure we are really disagreeing although i'm not sure I follow all of your logic.or at least intent. .

I think most ABA/IBL owners are in the business to brag to their friends "I own a team", if they were concerned about the business aspect because if they were they would have researched the league they were investing in before they brought the team. For most owners these teams can't be more than tax write-offs.


Where we agree (I think)..... Yes, anybody who starts a team or a league has an ego.....anybody who starts a business needs an ego to be successful because that means you think your hotdog stand is better than the one across the street and you'll perform that way.

Here is where we disagree. If I stated a league it would be to develop assets that I could sell-off for cash. Ego would have nothing to do with it. These leagues won't spend the money on coaching therefore, they won't have any assets to sell off. When starting a business, you have to have a mission, a product and a buyer. These guys are under the assumption that the buyer is the fan when in fact it's higher level leagues. They are involved in a business that they do not understand.



Where we disagree (I think)...is seemingly in the implied conclusion that the ABA is a a better home and/or a better solution than trying to find other teams of like mind and interests wo want to make things better or at minimum can count on each other. If you have ever lost money or sponsors or credibility because 3 of your opponents didn't show up one month, you'd understand the sentiment. The bottom line is that if the league dictator's interests are not in line with the teams (eg, the ABA), the team's don't have a chance. At least I see that the spin offs are trying to give the teams a voice.

All I see are misguided investors, true the ABA is the worst of the bunch, but i'd rather see the virus contained. When it spreads it just makes a bigger mess.

dbaproball
07-30-2007, 10:07 PM
Bectond - no offense, BTW:

There are really two discussions here: starting a team and starting a league.

Let's split them up.

Yes, there are those team "owners" (i'll use the term loosely) in minor league basketball that hurt the industry...and i'll agree that the low cost of entry in the ABA and IBL draws more of them.

But, the start of this thread referenced needing more true business people, with business acumen, to make this a reputable industry again. I stand by that based on what i have experienced first hand many times. We don't have that, and we do need it. Sound business principles are not being applied at the team or league level in the ABA as a whole.

Owning a league is a different story. First, I don't believe there is any real viable exit strategy anymore in terms of selling a minor league. The market is too diluted and tainted, and the NBA will only get interested if it has too. If that's the argument against starting a league, then ya I agree with that too.

But, that's not why these leagues are being started. They are being started so that they have some control over the product that comes to their towns. The weak teams that ruin the whole business need to be weeded out, and they're not currently under the ABA's expansion policies. The "pro ABAers" on this forum like to point out that it is all about the local market...and they are right....only they forget to tell you that the league can destroy your local market (and has in the ABA.)

The ABA infection as you point out puts the few good in with the many bad, effectively destroying them all. The truth is that there are up to 15 or 20 solid ABA teams, but the other 30 create the problems. If you want to cure this infection, the whole thing needs to be torn down and rebuilt. The splinter leagues may be just the start of that and perhaps the best way to begin the containment.

Finally, my point about ego is that it takes a little to be successful. That's all. You can't show me many successful owners, basketball players, doctors, lawyers, journalists, etc that don't have a little ego. Doing something for the sake of ego is not a recipe for success, but i don't think i ever said it was. Just one guy's opinion..........

Ken, Steelheads fan
07-30-2007, 10:48 PM
was not such a franchise killer, Ken?? I think you're confusing leagues here. The ABA is the one that is losing teams. The CBA is growing stronger.

No, I'm not confusing leagues. The ABA doesn't count because the ABA is a leaque. BTW, can you explain this Chicago Sun-Times article, Rediscovering Pittsburgh? I almost wanted to move there after reading it:
http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/travel/487390,TRA-News-pittsburgh29.article

Does the author even know the Xplosion exists? Dollars to donuts the author doesn't. A PBL team in Dallas can expect as much print publicity as the CBA team in Pittsburgh is currently getting. Both towns are major league cities with major college programs. Not at all conducive to Fall/Winter minor league hoops.

psbf
07-31-2007, 12:34 AM
with you about the ABA(at least under the current leadership). Chances are that won't change.
As far as the Xplosion, the article won't mention them because the author does not know about them and I would not expect them to, since no local tv station covers them(at least not since the X were in the ABA). But that will change in the future. Don't forget, similar to Dallas, the X are in a lot of competition. But I still promote them. It is good to see the Steel City get recognized by the Chicago paper, though. I'm sure you won't leave Gary, but you should visit, there is a lot to offer here.

bectond
08-01-2007, 11:06 AM
There are really two discussions here: starting a team and starting a league.

Let's split them up.

.........

These Leaques (IBL aka slow death ABA version, PBL..etc) are doomed to fail the milli-second they are created. Why, because they are not govern, regulated and most importantly structured properly to insure long term profitability. They are founded by novice that suffer from bouts of hubris. Iíll give you a long winded example of what I mean.

The Florida Gators just won back to back national titles. However, despite three years of tutelage under Billy Donovan, Joakim Noah still has the worst looking jump shots Iíve ever seen. Noah has not developed his shooting skills one bit in three years at one of the best college programs in the nation. Instead of taking advantage of the shortcomings of the NCAA in the exchange of developmental services with the NBA, the PBL leaque leaders have decided to create a new game with new rules that nobody asked for. Developing talent my friend is the market. It is not diluted (leaques don't really develop players do they?) or tainted and the NBA is extremely interested in finding partners that will assist them in developing their future human resource needs. I have read all the PBLís press releases and those guys are simply following the same wrong path that has been laid out for them by their spiritual leader - Mr. Newman.

At the team ownership level, they are like farmers in a Latin American or African socialist nations that refuse to put the hard work into farming their land because there is no profit incentive or reward in doing so. At the league creation level, they are like misguided Marxist Revolutionaries that nationalize farms without having an understanding of argi-business and international trade.

Anarchy is defined as a lack of government or imposed rule. A theoretical state of lawlessness in which there is no governing body, but each individual has absolute liberty.

All these leaques- the PBL included, were born out of Anarchy (The ABA). They all believe and follow the same Newman doctrine. However, each anarchist desires to be ruler of his own dominion.

I donít believe that anarchy is the best form of organizational structure or school of thought. You seem to be of the opinion that a select few of these Post-Newman anarchist are enlightened. In fact, you called the IBLís organizational structure is genius. However, businesses that purposely underfund one part of their business; say their penision fund, in order to push the cost onto someone else causes externality. Which is an excessive effect, often unforseen or unintended that accompanies an activity. For example, manufacturing casues pollution which is a nuisance to the public good and other industries like fishing. Leaques are notoriously poor inregards to issues such as low wages, poor working conditions and inadequate health care. I guess there is a fine line between genius an exploitation. What you see as genius I view as Primitivist actions.

In Conclusion, Common-pool resources; such as basketball leagues face problems of congestion and overexposure due to the inefficient planning of leaque creators. For instance, lets go back to the farming reference and take a look at the agricultural sector. The ability of a farmers to produce crops indefinitely, without causing irreversible damage to the ecosystem is directly linked to their ability to diversify their business to reduce economic risk.. Diversification makes it easier for farmers to be self-sufficient. Another example would be a pasture. Pastures only allow for a certain amount of grazing to occur each year without the core resource being harmed. In cases of excessive grazing however, the pasture may become more prone to erosion and eventually yield lower benefits to its users.
Common-pool resources can be extended via a positive feedback loop which in control theory is a closed system. Post Newman anarchist all seem to be in some type of delusional basketball arms race. The IBL wants a team in every North American town. The space cadet that heads CBA properties first wants to merger with a non-existent British league and now discussing CBA Mexico. And the PBL plans on become an international league right out of the gate. Maybe you see a difference in all this PNA rhetoric , however they all sound like hardline Newmanist to me. Same structure, same plan.

dbaproball
08-01-2007, 07:45 PM
Bectond, just a couple of quick rebuttals:

From your post: "In fact, you called the IBL’s organizational structure is genius." That really doesn't represent what I said well. In my weak attempt at light sarcasm, what I actually was saying that if making money (or in this case losing the least...same difference) was used as the criteria for judging the minor leagues, the IBL would in fact win. I still contend that the overall economics of minor league ball - eg, revenue opportunities vs. expenses to do it RIGHT - don't really add up in many markets. And, the "anarchy" you reference in the ABA makes it even more difficult.

I can't speak for all (of what I believe are now 5 or 6, not all publicized yet) of these spin off leagues, but I have some knowledge of one of the most prominent. To follow the political analogy, they simply want to leave the dictator, and now the ensuing anarchy, to create more of a democracy that can facilitate an environment more conducive to business. In fact, none of the core group I have experience with even wants to be "ruler." Much effort has been put into sharing the adminstrative (and "ruling") chores so that member teams could focus on their markets. This is just one among many differences in structure and plan. If someone wants to say "well, because they were dumb enough to be in the ABA in the first place, that's why they'll fail," I can offer no counter because only time will tell there.

But, if you truly look closely at just which teams are leaving the ABA, their funding, their business acumen, their track records (for those teams that played previously), their move to controlled growth leagues, their overall professionalism relative to others in the business, you would have to see that they have more of a chance to survive and perhaps get ahead than they would have otherwise. That's ultimately why we are seeing what we are seeing. I could call out 30 "questionable" ABA teams....notice that none of those are making moves to the C or P leagues. They haven't been invited and probably don't appreciate the predicaments they are really in.

But overall, your last post I think is very telling about the core of your postion: "Developing talent my friend is the market." Developing talent in the purest sense is a service, and of course one of the desired outcomes and goals of a minor league organization. To call it "the market" (implying that it is the exclusive component in ensuring minor league basketball success) is a stretch. I believe that the fans are smart enough to weed out teams stocked with Y players (alot in the ABA) from teams that have D1-level players on the roster who actually have a chance at the next level and who win consistently in the minor leagues.

Would you call the D-league a success? I'm not sure I can. By all accounts, they fail on many of the measuring sticks....attendance, financial viability, fan interest, etc. Yet, their stated mission is to develop players. Certainly the ABA has been a failure. You can say what you like about the IBL, but they at least fill a niche of being perhaps the most stable summer place to play for up and coming players. Yes, all of the promise of a "new game" from the PBL is a bit hokie, and on that point I will concede the "Newmanistic" label. But, I think that can be attributed to being a bit overzealous in their upstart, with an early belief that they had to somehow go over the top to get attention. (I actually think you will see some retreating from such statements in the future.) If you look closely, you will see a much different strategy being executed by the PBL when compared to the ABA.

I'd like to hear from some others on what they perceive as the real mission of the minor leagues, relative to their ability to survive financially.

The Magician
08-01-2007, 08:18 PM
I'd like to hear from some others on what they perceive as the real mission of the minor leagues, relative to their ability to survive financially.

Work at it ... Work at it some more ... And then continue to work ...

Till you feel that you just want to work at it even more! :mrgreen:

bectond
08-02-2007, 09:51 AM
If someone wants to say "well, because they were dumb enough to be in the ABA in the first place, that's why they'll fail," I can offer no counter because only time will tell there..

I believe the people that drank the ABA's kool aid, should have noticed the after taste. The reason they ignored the after taste is an important fact.
They understood that they were drinking the basketball equivatent of Mad Dog 20/20. If they decide to leave and then join a league that is well structured O.K.. But if they leave the ABA and form a new leaque and use the same Newmanist ideas and rhetoric then I feel it's fair for a person like myslf to assume that their league is nothing more than an ABA spin-off leaque



But overall, your last post I think is very telling about the core of your postion: "Developing talent my friend is the market." Developing talent in the purest sense is a service, and of course one of the desired outcomes and goals of a minor league organization. To call it "the market" (implying that it is the exclusive component in ensuring minor league basketball success) is a stretch.

Minor League Basketball leagues must specialize in order to survive. Diversifying the business along with setting up a closed system with well defined parameters for each league is a must.
History has shown that growth is closely associated with increases in complex Divisions of labor. Let's take a look at farming again....

Organic Farmers farm several crops at one time often having both livestock and field crops. Some crops are used to feed the livestock, the livestock are used to produce the organic matter needed to ensure soil fertility and the rest of the crops are sold on the open market for profit.
Organic farms have healthier soil and make higher profits than conventional farms. The draw backs are organic farms are more expensive and pest can have a bigger import on organic crops than conventional crops.

For example, the farmer may produce corn to feed his cattle and raise cattle to feed his family & fertilize the soil but he understands that soybeans are his cash crop. There is a system in place to ensure that his family is self-sufficient. The other crops and cattle provide his faimly with secondary crops to sell on the open market and enough food feed his or her family while replenishing the land with nutrients. However, it’s the soy that provides him with a means to afford and acquire additional resources.

Kyrylo Fesenko was drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers and traded to the Utah Jazz on draft day. The Jazz are currently negotiating a $500,000 buy-out with the team he plays for in Europe. His team is self-sufficient due to sponsorships, ticket sales and the like... but it’s buy-outs like Fesenko’s that will allow his former team to turn a profit. If an American minor league were able to produce (2) Blue-chip Fesenko type talents annually (the soy) and 10-15 prospects that could move on to higher paying international leagues. That league could gross 2.5 million per season on buy-outs alone.


Would you call the D-league a success? .


Yes, but Stern did not plan that league out well and it struggled it's first few years. He did not understand the market either. They have corrected 90% of the errors and the future looks extremely bright to me.